Workplace Injury

Praise for energy workers

»Posted by on Oct 10, 2017 in Workplace Injury | 0 comments

America needs to recognize the great work its citizens do in the oil and gas business. For so long, there has been a constant stream of complaints against these industries, with a similar disdain only just left unspoken for the people who make such industries work.

At the appointment of Rex Tillerson to the position of Secretary of State, many scoffed due to the business in which he made his name: oil.

And yet, America could not function without gas and oil (and to a lesser but still important extent, coal). America needs its fossil fuels to function, and it should begin to show some respect for that point.

It’s all well and good to mock an executive like Tillerson. It may even be worth pointing out a general need to move away from fossil fuels and into renewable energies. There is a strong argument to be made for a clear policy to eventually move America in that direction.

After all, there are foreign entanglements to consider, and the environment, though the exact nature of the problem is unclear, is certainly harmed by so much use of fossil fuels.

All that being said, however, that does not change the fact that at this present moment America makes its living and ensures its quality of life all thanks to gas and oil.

Barring a small number of people in this county, most Americans drive to work using oil, heat their homes and charge their appliances with gas, oil, or coal, and generally have some form of electronics on their person (phones, notebooks, tablets) that has been charged by similar means.

Essentially, nothing about the American way of life would be possible without these industries. And still, it is a rare day indeed when some small amount of praise is offered to those who make it possible.

Here, it is fair to forget the contentious figures like Tillerson. Instead, focus on the individual hardworking Americans who go to work every day to keep the lights turned on for millions.

The work done by these people in all its various forms and parts of the process is not always glamorous. In fact, it is often dangerous. There are accidents at plants and refineries every day. Such a statistic is incredible, especially for how little any of it is reported.

This dangerous work deserves to be rewarded with praise similar to what other professions receive. If teachers prepare children for the future, energy workers get them to the school today. Police keep the streets safe, and firefighters fight destruction, but neither would be possible without the workers in the energy industry.

So, take a moment today and thank those who work hard in relatively dangerous work to make sure everyone has heat in their homes, gas in their car, and charged phones in their pockets.

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Construction Site Accidents and the Importance of Seeking Legal Advice

»Posted by on Oct 19, 2013 in Personal Injury, Workplace Injury | 0 comments

One of the most common causes of accidents that lead to a high rate of injuries and death is work-related; and among all job types recorded in the US Department of Labor, accidents in and around construction sites top the list.

The early part of the 20th century showed the most alarming number in construction-related accidents, where workers were the primary victims. Though definitely a very regrettable issue, something good came out of it, at least, such as the implementation of the Workers’ Compensation Law, which was passed in 1902 in Maryland. It was between 1911 and 1920, though, when majority of the states started to adopt the law (North Carolina, Florida, South Carolina, Arkansas and Mississippi were the last five states to adopt it – between 1929 and 1948). The Workers’ Compensation Law mandated majority of employers in the US to provide workers insurance benefits (which included wage replacement and medical benefits) that will ensure fast financial assistance in the event of injury or death.

Another law that was passed, to significantly reduce the occurrence of construction accidents, was the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, which actually led to the creation of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA was tasked to “assure safe and healthful working conditions” in all working environments for the good of all employees.

By formulating safety construction site standards and making sure that employers and workers strictly observe them, OSHA has helped greatly in decreasing the number of construction site accidents. Though hundreds of fatal accidents still occurred, a significant downtrend, from 1992 – 2012, is very evident. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the US Department of Labor, the number of fatalities in construction site accidents for the last five years, from 2008 – 2012, are 1,016, 879, 802, 781 and 817, respectively.

The top four causes of accidents, which OSHA calls the “Fatal Four,” are falls, electrocution, struck by object and caught-in/between. Other causes of accidents in construction sites (which may injure worker of private individuals, by the way) include insufficient scaffolding, falling objects, lack of edge protection, especially in roof work and improper use of ladders and/or hoists.

Seeking legal advice is highly important in the event of construction site accidents. A lawyer can help you with the procedures that include assessment of the extent of your injury, correctly filling out of claims forms and timely filing of your claims. This is due to the fact that many claimants are denied of their benefits due to lack of or wrong information written in forms. To many others whose claims have been approved, the amount of compensation given to them is far smaller than what they ought to receive. With a knowledgeable legal counsel assisting you, you will never fall into these added inconveniences.

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